Paramedicine Across Canada Expo 2024 Program

To download or view a copy of the Paramedicine Across Canada Expo 2024 follow the link provided

Pre-Conference Education
September 18, 2024
8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Dalhousie University Tupperware Building
By

AIME Clinical Cadaver Workshop

A hands-on, skill-focused advanced airway learning experience using clinical cadavers!

Cost $125
Purchase admission here

1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Dalhousie University Tupperware Building
By

AIME Clinical Cadaver Workshop

A hands-on, skill-focused advanced airway learning experience using clinical cadavers!

Cost $125
Purchase admission here

8:00 am - 12:00 pm
Convention Centre
By

Simple Wound Closure

Participants will perform wound closure for simple interrupted, mattress and combination skin closures.

Cost $85 - Refreshments provided
Purchase admission here

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Convention Center
By

Simple Wound Closure

Participants will perform wound closure for simple interrupted, mattress and combination skin closures.

Cost $85 - Refreshments provided
Purchase admission here

8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Convention Center
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ReGen Resiliency

Spend a day learning knowledge and gaining tools to help you live and work sustainably. You will go home with a wellness toolkit to help you get back on track!

Cost $150 - Lunch provided
Purchase admission here

9:00 am - 11:00 am
Convention Center
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12 Lead Interpretation

Prepare to embark on an epic journey through the galaxy of ECG interpretation with the guidance of the Jedi Master, Dave Klein. In this thrilling 2-hour course, you'll delve deep into the mystical realm of the heart's electrical forces, learning to decipher its cryptic messages with the skill of a Jedi Knight.

Cost $60 - Refreshments provided
Purchase admission here

8:30 am - 12:30 am
Convention Center
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BLS Certification

The participant will complete a Heart and Stroke BLS initial (or renewal) certification.

Cost $75 - Refreshments provided
Purchase admission here

1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Convention Center
By

BLS Renewal

The participant will complete a Heart and Stroke BLS initial (or renewal) certification.

Cost $50 - Refreshments provided
Purchase admission here

8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Convention Center
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Kindermedic (2-day)

KinderMedic is a two day program designed to address the gaps in paramedic pediatric education. It provides 16
hours of instruction, comprised mainly of small group skill sessions followed by a number of high fidelity
simulations to allow learning to be applied and reinforced.

Cost $200 - September 18th and 19th Two required days.

Refreshments and Lunch provided each day.

Purchase admission here

Pre-Conference Education
September 19, 2024
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Convention Center

Research Day (no cost)

Dr. Georgette Eaton

Dalhousie University, Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of EMS
has partnered with the McNally Project for Paramedicine Research, and the Paramedic Association of Canada (PAC) to present a PAC Expo Preconference Research Day

Enroll Here

8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Convention Center
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Casting and Splinting

Increase your knowledge and hands-on skills in the simulated workshop. Participants will learn to apply a variety of casts and splints.

Cost $85 - Refreshment provided
Purchase Admission Here

1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Convention Center
By

Casting and Splinting

Increase your knowledge and hands-on skills in the simulated workshop. Participants will learn to apply a variety of casts and splints.

Cost $85 - Refreshment provided
Purchase Admission Here

8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Convention Center
By

Kindermedic (2-day)

KinderMedic is a two day program designed to address the gaps in paramedic pediatric education. It provides 16
hours of instruction, comprised mainly of small group skill sessions followed by a number of high fidelity
simulations to allow learning to be applied and reinforced.

Cost $200 - September 18th and 19th
Two required days.

Refreshments and Lunch provided each day.
Purchase Admission Here

9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Offsite Start and end location to be confirmed
By

Amazing PACE Halifax

Learn and explore!
The participant will learn the geography of Halifax and its associated history while having to recall information related to paramedic practice.

Cost $65
Purchase Admission Here

1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Offsite Start and end location to be confirmed
By

Amazing PACE Halifax

Learn and explore!
The participant will learn the geography of Halifax and its associated history while having to recall information related to paramedic practice.

Cost $65
Purchase Admission Here

12:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Convention Center
By

Active Assailant Event EPSO & CAF

Cost $85 - Refreshments provided
Purchase Admission Here

8:30 am - 12:30 pm
Convention Center
By

Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Venous Access

The participant will use US to guide peripheral insertion for venous access on a simulated structure… (Ryan to also incorporate paramedic US guided IV insertion research)
Butterfly and US Machine

Cost $85 - Refreshments provided
Purchase Admission Here

1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Convention Center
By

Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Venous Access

The participant will use US to guide peripheral insertion for venous access on a simulated structure… (Ryan to also incorporate paramedic US guided IV insertion research)
Butterfly and US Machine

Cost $85 - Refreshments provided
Purchase Admission Here

Day 1
September 20, 2024
8:30 am - 9:00 am

OPENING CEREMONIES

9:00 am - 10:00 am

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Kelsi Sheren
10:00 am - 10:30 am

NUTRITION BREAK

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Clinical Track

Responding without a clue: Paramedics and the needs of sexual assault survivors

Mike Sugimoto
Lyndsay Kay

Many sexual assault survivors experience continued powerlessness, shame and guilt while accessing healthcare services due to insensitive treatment by health service workers, pre-hospital care and paramedics inclusive.  However, when treated with care, compassion, clear explanations and choice, survivors experienced positive associations with health care and can feel “humanized”.  These positive interactions may be viewed as positive social support, which has been proven to diminish psychological impact of stressful life events. Unfortunately, many paramedic services across Canada and the United States do not have clinical practice guidelines to support paramedics in responding to calls for sexual assault; paramedics, in general, are not trained to address the complex trauma and identities of the people who have been sexually assaulted (for example: Indigenous women, transgender folks, historical sexual assaults, or men).
Session Objectives:
1. Discuss the importance and application of trauma informed, culturally safe practice for survivors of sexual assault
2. Analyze current training and clinical practice guidelines for sexual assault response
3. Outline best practice for sexual assault calls, with key considerations for specific populations
4. Identify strategies to support agencies in developing sexual assault-specific practice guidelines

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Leadership Track

Translating your Paramedic skills to being a quality leader

Katriana Scaife

Conceptual Roots

To support the growth of Professional Paramedicine

To support Paramedics in identifying their translatable skills, thus increasing personal and professional resiliency and self-efficacy

In recognition that while many Paramedics advance into leadership roles within organizations, substantive leadership mentorship and training is not generally a part of Paramedic curriculum, nor consistently provided across organizations

The same principles that guide Paramedics in delivering high quality patient care can be applied to being an effective leader in a Paramedic organization

Preparing Paramedic leaders to better cope with and address leadership challenges, contributes to improved workplace culture and psychological safety for all members of Paramedic organizations
Presentation Outline
Designed and presented to follow/mimic the general pathway of a patient care call, which cognitively builds upon a familiar process, to identify leadership strategies to engage team members

Introduction: Introduce presenter background in Paramedicine and Clinical & Organizational Psychology; acknowledge challenges of leadership/human factors; normalize that leadership is challenging; discuss the conceptual roots of the presentation

Toned Out: Answering the leadership call- Like an emergency call, you have limited control over who you ‘attend’ to; recognizing the nature of your relationships as a leader and the similarities to patient care- there is an innate imbalance of power, issues are not meant to be personal, and boundaries are needed for mutual safety

Assessing & Obtaining Hx: The importance of knowing your team and being aware of outstanding issues, concerns; being open-minded can help avoid tunnel vision of ‘distracting injuries’ and increase bias awareness; recognizing that conditions/reactions are fluid and can be stabilized and exacerbated

Maintaining Confidentiality: Just like in patient care, in a leadership role we must manage personal information that is not common knowledge, as it relates to the teams we support; any information shared should be purposeful and only shared with those who need to know; recognizing that someone sharing with you, is not a license to share with others; professional boundaries
➢ Delivering Care: Based on presenting information you must make decisions and carryout
plans of action in supporting your team members, while considering both acute and
long-term implications. Just in like in triage, you must consider resources and
implications that extend beyond the person who you are currently addressing and the
impacts on the system. Proactivity goes farther than reactivity.
➢ Reassessing Your Interventions: Checking-in and following up is a crucial part of your
leadership role; never assume that what you have done has accomplished the goal; find
out what may need to be addressed again, addressed in a different way, or escalated to
another party
➢ Documentation: Any challenging role means keeping track of what you are doing and
noting the things around you and with your team. It can be beneficial to document your
leadership activities- just like a PCR, sometimes it can seem mundane but you want
appropriate documentation for the exceptions and when things get tricky. It can save your
butt and validate your rationale.
➢ Auditing, Debriefing, & Honing Your Skills: Being an effective professional means
engaging in reflection, seeking feedback, learning from your experiences, and identifying
where you can get better. When we are dealing with organizations and people, there is
always emerging evidence and practices, just like in emergency medicine.
➢ Q&A
Presentation Objectives:
• To help Paramedics identify patient care skills that are transferable to leadership roles
• To help Paramedics develop professional boundaries as part of a team, especially when
taking on leadership roles
• To inform, normalize, and validate the challenges that come with being a leader in
Paramedicine
• To encourage Paramedics to view leadership roles with a sense of privilege, integrity, and
professionalism akin to their front-line roles

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Education Track

The art of running high fidelity simulation for Paramedics: planning, execution, feedback and safe debriefs

Rance Lilley
Danny Kustra

This presentation aims to underscore the critical role of high-fidelity simulation in the field of prehospital medicine, with a specific focus on standardization, fostering a "CUS" culture, and delivering effective and safe feedback. The objective of this session is to inspire dialogue and collaboration among healthcare professionals, educators, and leaders, with the shared goal of advancing ongoing simulation practices to ensure the well-being of patients and the future of medical care.

Debriefing and simulation should be consistently conducted in a manner that encourages individuals to be receptive to feedback, rather than viewing it as punitive.

Outline:

1. Introduction
-Definition and significance of high-fidelity simulation
-Overview of relevant literature and research findings
2. Impact of high-fidelity simulation on patient-centered healthcare metrics
-Examination of the benefits and potential drawbacks of simulation
-Case studies highlighting the integration of simulation in high-performing agencies
3. Establishing an effective simulation program in conjunction with QA/QI
-Customizing simulation to address departmental needs and objectives
-Incorporating policy, protocol, medication, or equipment changes into simulations
-Addressing high-risk, low-volume procedures
-Exploring innovative and cost-effective approaches to simulation delivery
4. Challenges in implementing and sustaining simulation programs
-Discussion of cultural and organizational factors influencing simulation adoption
-Overcoming resistance and fostering a culture of ongoing simulation
-Elevating the professional status of simulation and strategies for achieving stakeholder buy-in
5. Creating a safe and supportive simulation environment
-Ensuring clearly defined roles, opportunities, and adherence to basic assumptions
-Validating concerns and incorporating realistic elements into scenarios
6. Effective debriefing techniques
-Exploring different approaches to providing constructive feedback
-Cultivating a "CUS" culture in both simulation and real-world patient encounters
7. Standardization of simulation templates
-Discussion of a comprehensive template that includes clear instructions and relevant content
8. Conclusion
-Encouraging participants to apply simulation principles within their respective teams
-Key takeaways emphasizing the importance of standardization, effective debriefing, and ongoing simulation practice

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Specialty Track

Supporting the mental health of paramedics and their families: CIPSRT

Dr. Renee MacPhee

The Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment (CIPSRT) was founded in 2017 as an open space where Canadian Public Safety Personnel (PSP) from “coast-to-coast-to-coast” could access the most up-to-date information on mental health and wellbeing. Under the scientific direction of a team of multi-disciplinary researchers, CIPSRT serves as a knowledge exchange hub for knowledge synthesis, translation and exchange for the CIHR-CIPSRT National Research Consortium for Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries among Public Safety Personnel. Through its national network of academics, researchers, clinicians, and PSP leadership, CIPSRT is a multi-million dollar funded, not-for-profit institute that engages existing academic research resources and facilitates the development of new research, research capacity, and effective knowledge translation by responding to the identified needs of PSP. Through research and development of evidence informed resources, CIPSRT supports high quality and easily accessible mental health care for all PSP, their leadership and their families.

PRESENTATION GOALS:
This session will:
• explain the origin and development of CIPSRT;
• explain role of key stakeholders and contributors including the Public Safety Steering Committee, the Academic / Research / Clinician Advisory Committee, and the Academic / Research / Clinician Network;
• describe the research findings with respect to the mental health and wellbeing of PSP in Canada; and,
• demonstrate the array of resources and tools that are freely available to PSP through the CIPSRT website.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
Upon completion of the session, attendees will be able to:
1. Explain the origin and development of CIPSRT.
2. Explain role of key stakeholders and contributors including the Public Safety Steering Committee, the Academic / Research / Clinician Advisory Committee, and the Academic / Research / Clinician Network.
3. Describe highlights of the research findings with respect to the mental health and wellbeing of PSP in Canada.
4. Access and utilize the resources and tools that are freely available to PSP and their families through the CIPSRT website.

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

LUNCH BREAK

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Clinical Track

A tale of two wheezers: pediatric respiratory distress

Jonathan Lee

Objectives:
Discuss treatment recommendations in paediatric respiratory distress
Review pharmacology related to management of respiratory distress
Discuss differentitating asthma and bronchiolitis

Description:
Respiratory season is approaching and the smaller the kid is, the scarier it can be! Can you tell the difference between bronchiolitis and asthma? Does it matter? Join me for a blend of practical experience and modern evidence that will discuss the assessment, differential diagnosis and treatment options for the wheezy child!

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Leadership Track

If you’re not sitting at the table, you’re probably on the menu: how EMS data can influence policy, access funding, & improve your performance

Stephen Turner

With the introduction of electronic patient care reports over a decade ago, paramedic services are sitting on a goldmine of data, but how well do we really use it? Over the course of the presentation, I will go through how to go beyond traditional Key Performance Indicators typically used by paramedic services and talk about how this data can be used to inform public policy beyond EMS.

Paramedic data can support public health efforts through syndromic surveillance of respiratory illnesses, or heatmapping calls disproportionately impacting vulnerable populations (overdoses, mental health crises, environmental emergencies, etc.). Paramedic services can also provide data on high-risk intersections to help prioritize investments for upgrading public infrastructure, or demonstrate trends with environmental emergencies such as heat and cold injuries, for example.

But we also need to recognize the limitations of our data. What are the data elements in which we can have confidence, and what data elements should we be skeptical about? What’s the difference between using data for operational decision-making versus using our data for clinical research?

The presentation will explore how to collect, interpret and present data to capture attention, improve operations and influence policy.

This session will provide opportunity for participation and discussion to highlight and share how participants are using their data to drive change.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Education Track

Talk it up! Unleashing tools for effective communication, feedback and mentoring

Carla Roy

This interactive session is tailored for individuals aspiring to become effective at giving feedback, whether to colleagues or students. Participants will gain valuable insights and practical strategies into providing constructive feedback, handling difficult conversations, and fostering a supportive environment for growth. With the goal of positively impacting the growth and development of their peers or students while navigating the complexities of providing feedback in diverse and challenging situations.
In this session, participants will:
1) Learn the art of providing feedback that is constructive, specific, and actionable.
2) Identify challenges in providing feedback to difficult individuals.
3) Explore techniques for initiating and managing challenging conversations with professionalism and empathy.
4) Understand the importance of creating a supportive and inclusive environment for growth.
5) Discuss ways to build trust and rapport with those being coached or mentored.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Specialty Track

Paramedic evidence-based practice

Dr. Judah Goldstein
Jennifer Greene

Our session will focus on one of the ten guiding principles “Evidence Informed Practice and Systems”, as defined by Tavares (2022), supported by the enabling factor of “Promoting a Shared Understanding of Paramedicine”. The Paramedic Evidence Based Practice Program (PEP) (https://emspep.cdha.nshealth.ca/Default.aspx) will be introduced and demonstrated. This program is a freely available repository of appraised paramedic services evidence. It is made by paramedics and EMS clinicians for paramedics and is essential to evidence informed care in paramedicine. A live tutorial of the program will be presented.

Passionate speakers and paramedic researchers, Dr. Judah Goldstein and Jennifer Greene, partner to share an interactive and engaging look into the world of knowledge translation and Paramedic Evidence Based Practice and its role in moving our profession forward. Judah and Jennifer have shared this important and empowering message locally at such venues as the Nova Scotia Oak Island Paramedic Symposium and the Paramedic Association of PEI Symposium. This content has been enthusiastically received and they hope to have the opportunity to share this call to action on a national platform.

Objectives:

• Discuss the definition and principles of paramedicine, and the role of evidence-based practice in its current and future state.

• Introduce the Prehospital Evidence-Based Practice Program (PEP) and how to use this tool to enhance your practice.

• Define knowledge translation and paramedic evidence based practice.

• Describe how these processes are critical to the evolution of paramedicine.

• Share some inspiring examples of practice changing paramedic research.

• Highlight career opportunities in non-clinical roles, such as research.

• Share methods and opportunities to ensure evidence based decision making is part of your practice.

This will be an engaging and interactive session with opportunities to discuss and pose questions in real-time.

2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

NUTRITION BREAK

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Clinical Track

Updates, controversies & pearls in advanced airway management in the prehospital setting

Dr. George Kovacs
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Leadership Track

Evolving leadership culture in EMS

Kaitlin Peters

Session Description:
From a first-person perspective of experiencing change in clinical leadership over time, this session describes the evolution of clinical leadership within Emergency Medical Services from a militant approach to the modern style of developing a participative leadership culture amongst frontline staff that has been leveraged from the Paramedic Chiefs of Canada: Paramedic Leadership Competency Framework.
Historical clinical leadership in the speaker’s organization had been militant with limited opportunities for engaging with management to create change within the service model. This session will explore the impact that having people in clinical leadership that are encouraged to engage, inspire and develop others has had on the frontline staff, the organization, and patient care. The session will also discuss how frontline staff have benefited the organization over time by providing insight and feedback to direct changes. As participative leadership is the focus, the session will describe this leadership philosophy by delving into the empowerment of the team that is cultivated by utilizing the most skilled and knowledgeable staff members for the right projects.
Feedback received from frontline staff on their experience with the evolution of clinical leadership over the last 5 years is the basis for why we continue to lead this way and why we want to inspire others to do the same. During this session the feedback will be shared, and these thoughts will be supported through lived experience of current leaders from Shared Health ERS- EMS West Zone in Manitoba. These leaders entered EMS during a time when we leaders were feared, and developed themselves into the leaders that are described by the Paramedic Chiefs of Canada Framework.
Session Objectives:
By the end of this session participants will be able to Illustrate negative impacts of militant leadership approaches and if they can recognize these traits within their own organization. The participants will be able to identify positive impacts of leading others as described by the Paramedic Chiefs of Canada: Paramedic Leadership Competency Framework and leave the session with the ability to discuss how leaders can develop this style of leadership within their organization.

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Education Track

A unique approach to continuing education

Janel Swain

Description: Paramedic continuing education differs across the country, and even within provinces and territories. This interactive session will describe the unique provincial approach to both prescribed and elective continuing education used by Emergency Health Services (EHS) Nova Scotia and relate the challenges and successes with the current continuing education program. The session will also provide an opportunity for attendees to share information regarding the continuing education programs within their systems, including a discussion on challenges, benefits and outcomes.
Learning Objectives: At the end of this in-person session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe a multi-modal approach to education within one Canadian EMS system.
2. Identify a variety of approaches to continuing education from across Canada.
3. Support networking and collaboration with fellow EMS learners and educators on continuing education practices

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Specialty Track

Navigating the challenges of multitasking in Paramedicine: balancing high tactile tasks with effective treatment management

Geoff Murphy

Introduction:
● Background Context: Brief overview of the demanding environment paramedics work in,
emphasizing the need for multitasking and awareness of the risk of making mistakes.
● Personal Introduction: Share your experience and expertise in the field of paramedicine.
Presentation Objectives:
Understanding Multitasking in Paramedicine:
● Define multitasking in the context of paramedicine.
● Discuss the importance of multitasking in emergency medical situations.
Identifying High Tactile Tasks:
● Detail what constitutes high tactile tasks in paramedic scenarios.
● Explore examples of such tasks and their critical nature.
Risks of Multitasking:
● Examine the potential risks and challenges associated with multitasking in high-stress
environments.
● Present research or case studies highlighting these risks.
Effective Treatment Management:
● Discuss strategies for balancing hands-on tasks with the delegation of treatment.
● Introduce best practices for maintaining patient care quality while multitasking.
Mitigating Risks:
● Offer practical tips and techniques to minimize risks.
● Highlight training or tools that can aid in managing multitasking more effectively.

Day 2
September 20, 2024
9:00 am - 10:00 am

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Todd Doherty
10:00 am - 10:30 am

NUTRITION BREAK

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Clinical Track

An approach to Neonatal emergencies for Paramedics

Anthony Lacolucci

Description: This talk opens with how birthing care trends in Canada’s Health system contribute to a rising number of Neonatal Emergencies. It briefly introduces Paramedics to statistics on the high morbidity and mortality of the neonatal period. The talk’s majority focus is on 10 common neonatal emergency conditions. These are organized into an easily remembered acronym that a Paramedic can review when faced with caring for an unwell looking neonate. Each condition is reviewed individually with specific emphasis on where a Paramedic’s history, assessment and interventions can be applied. The talk includes many example pictures throughout and concludes with case studies where the speaker engages the audience in applying the acronym. The speaker’s extensive experience in both Paramedicine and Neonatal Critical Care insure that this talk is presented for Paramedics by a Paramedic. The speaker also has the experience and knowledge to field any general questions in the question and answer portion.
Objectives:
1. Learn an acronym designed to help Paramedics recall 10 common conditions causing Neonatal Emergencies.

2. Review each condition with a focus on where a Paramedic’s history gathering, assessments and interventions can be applied to each.

3. Apply this acronym-based assessment approach to prehospital Neonatal Emergency case studies.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Leadership Track

Health system transformation through emergency health services: renewing and optimizing the Paramedic role

Andrew Travers

Over the past few decades, Emergency Health Services (EHS) across Canada have been efficiently and quietly renewing their scope and role in the healthcare sector as they have attempted to heal the healthcare crisis upon us . Up to this point, much of the knowledge exchanged has been from the hospital to the EHS system, specifically “if it works in the hospital system, then it should work in the ambulance system”. Perhaps, it is now time for knowledge exchange to proceed in the other direction, that is, for the hospital (and community system of care) to learn from the EHS leadership and the innovations they have achieved. If innovations and evolutions have occurred in EHS systems in Canada despite their own heterogenous and unique epidemiology then there must be some strategies that be learned from EHS and applied in healthcare sectors to overcome their own unique barriers.

In this interactive workshop/presentation, participants will learn key strategies used in the 25 year transformation of the Nova Scotia (NS) EHS healthcare, public health and public safety system. A system where: [1] transport is ancillary not mandatory when calling 911, [2] alternative care pathways and teams can be built by optimizing existing healthcare providers, [3] integrated clinical performance is measurable and accountable, and [4] the role of an EMS can be optimised in all roles of health prevention and phases of care. Examples of NS transformation include: [1] paramedics, nurses and physicians imbedded in the ‘911 call centre’, [2] paramedics providing palliative care at home; [3] single paramedic mobile integrated health responders; [4] paramedic supportive discharge programs and [5] collaborative emergency centres where onsite RN and medic work with an online EHS physician.

Learning Objectives
• Identify and co-create key strategies used in the EHS system of care that can be applied to your own local healthcare ecosystem.
• Define [1] taxonomies of systems as it relates to programs of care and performance indicators, [2] the dyad leadership model, [3] speaking common clinical languages, and [4] the continuum of collaboration.
• Implement an inventory of integrated community, prehospital and hospital paramedic programs across Canada, US, Australia, and UK.
• Implement immediate and develop long-term knowledge translation tools and knowledge networks to interface with EMS stakeholders and a provincial, national and international networks.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Education Track

Integrating diversity, equity and inclusion into Paramedic curriculum

Lyon Kengis

Abstract: As our society evolves, so does the understanding of the need for healthcare providers to be equipped with a comprehensive understanding of DEI principles. This presentation aims to provide insights into best practices for integrating DEI within the framework of paramedic education, ensuring that future paramedics possess the tools necessary to deliver equitable care and improve health outcomes for the diverse communities we serve.
Summary: Educational institutions and paramedic services are at a pivotal moment of recognizing the importance of DEI. While there is a growing awareness, many institutions grapple with the practical aspects of implementing DEI into their curriculum effectively. My presentation will address this challenge by providing a framework and actionable strategies to make DEI an integral part of paramedic education.

Learning Objectives
1. Historical Relationships in Healthcare
• Understand the historical context of healthcare in marginalized communities and its impact on provider-patient relationships
• Unpack the legacies that shape perceptions and influence healthcare interactions.
2. Integrated Model
• Learn about the most comprehensive model for integrating DEI into curriculum
3. DEI Principles
• Garner an awareness of DEI principles (social determinants of health, equity, power/privilege…)
• Understand how to apply DEI principles to current curriculum
4. Labs - Comprehensive Assessments
• Develop an informed approach to assessments that considers the diverse needs of patients.
• Tailor assessment techniques to encompass a broader range of health indicators.

These learning objectives aim to provide a structured and actionable framework for attendees to gain valuable insights and skills during the presentation.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Specialty Track

Going from hospital to home: Supportive discharge model of care

Sean Collins
Tyler MacCuspic

Our presentation will explore the impacts of how paramedics can tailor their care and service delivery for a population of hospital in-patients and emergency department patients who can be discharged from hospital earlier and receive care and recover at home. We will introduce the concept of collaboration with various internal and external partners to provide safe and effective patient care. Discuss dynamics of discharge enhancement, admission avoidance, hospital readmission, and return emergency department visits. Share the model of care delivered by Community Paramedics and Extended Care Paramedics in Nova Scotia.
Learning Objectives:
1. The positive impacts of expanding Paramedic scope and practices
2. Improve understanding of input and output interventions to support the reduction of ED crowding
3. Highlight key stakeholders and the importance of the most responsible physician’s support

11:30 am - 1:00 pm

LUNCH BREAK

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Clinical Track

Advancing prehospital trauma resuscitation with the use of blood

Ian Drennon

The practice of blood product administration for major trauma is well established in both in-hospital and military settings. While the use of blood in trauma has trickled its way into civilian paramedic services this is still the exception and not the standard for prehospital trauma care. Through a case-based approach this talk will examine current research and discuss the benefits and challenges of prehospital blood administration including, scenarios that may benefit from prehospital blood products. We will also discuss some of the early success of the current blood on board program at Ornge Air Ambulance in Ontario and the upcoming SWIFT study examining the impact of administration of prehospital whole blood.

Objectives:
1. Describe the current best practice in prehospital trauma resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock
2. Describe the benefits and challenges to blood product administration
3. Describe ongoing research in Canada around prehospital blood administration
4. Discuss the future of prehospital resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Leadership Track

Trauma-informed investigations: Approaches in Emergency Medical Service Organizations

Gabriele Mroz

Trauma-informed investigative approaches offer a unique lens for conducting investigations involving first responder personnel. While considered a novel approach within organizational regulatory environments, trauma-informed approaches are widely supported within the criminal justice system as a means of mitigating the effects felt by reliving triggering and traumatic events. Trauma-informed approaches offer an appreciation of the underlying emotional responses formed by personal and professional experiences, both overt and covert. It provides a lens through which to understand the impactful neurological, biological, psychological, and social effects trauma has on an individual. By combining trauma-informed approaches with standard investigative approaches, emergency service regulators can create psychologically safer investigative practices while maintaining the integrity of investigations.

This session aims to initiate conversations surrounding the application of trauma-informed investigative approaches within emergency medical service organizations. 
Furthermore, recognizing that quality assurance measures are the second leading cause of critical incident stress among first responders, providing organizations with knowledge and tools to mitigate these risks is essential to maintaining the psychological safety of front-line responders. 

Information presented in this session was derived from first-person research conducted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master's Degree in Leadership – Healthcare specialization through Royal Roads University with research and ethics board approvals. I was the primary researcher with the full support of Peel Regional Paramedic Service, with the project being completed in June 2023. Additionally, this research was presented as a poster at the Ontario Association of Paramedic Chiefs in September 2023.  

All delegates participating in this session will receive a trauma-informed investigation plan created as an associated knowledge product with this research. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this presentation, delegates will be able to: 

1. Gain an understanding of trauma-informed approaches and why they are needed in first responder organizations.  
2. Appreciate the prevalence of critical incident and post-traumatic stress injuries within first responder organizations and how investigative methodologies can perpetuate them. 
3. Understand the application of the PEACE framework as a deliberate and reliable guide for organizational investigations. 
4. Discuss trauma-informed adaptations to the PEACE model framework to create psychologically safer investigations.
5. Identify signs of trauma in paramedic and first responder subjects during investigative interviewing. 
6. Recognize the correlation between indicators of deception and signs of acute trauma during investigative interviewing.
7. Identify areas of opportunity to incorporate trauma-informed investigative approaches within first responder organizations. 
8. Discuss the limitations of trauma-informed investigative approaches. 

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Education Track

Integrating micro-learning and assessment to recruit qualified, motivated teams

Kayella Mackenzie

In this session, we will discuss the use of micro-learning recruitment tools to help organizations optimize learning delivery in recruitment and orientation programs. We will introduce the concepts of motivation and neuroplasticity and how they related to learning and reinforcing professional competencies. We will discuss specialized recruitment tools currently available for internal and external competitions and outline the factors involved in designing recruitment tools. Participants will learn how to design a customized recruitment tool for their organization

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Specialty Track

To Be Confirmed

2:00 pm - 2:30 pm

NUTRITION BREAK

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Clinical Track

Equity in Paramedic Care

Nikki Little
Neil McDonald

In common with research across healthcare, a growing body of paramedic and prehospital literature confirms that inequities exist in many areas of practice. Inequities are differences in access, treatment, and outcomes among individuals and populations that are systemic, avoidable, and unjust. Inequities in paramedic care have the potential to undermine improvements in patient treatments and contribute to patient harm. However, they cannot be removed without deliberate efforts to identify and address them.
Canadian paramedic services face many obstacles in tackling these problems. These range from limitations in data collection and linkage to conceptual gaps in understanding around what constitutes equity, bias, and discrimination.
Given the critical role that EMS plays within the health care system, it is imperative that EMS systems reduce inequities by delivering evidence-based, high quality care for the communities and patients we serve.
This presentation will provide a roadmap to overcoming barriers and reducing inequities. Its specific objectives are to:
• Summarize the latest research on inequity in paramedic care and related fields
• Consider the unique landscape of health equity in Canada
• Examine paramedic service data through an equity lens
• Identify barriers to progress at individual and service levels
• Discuss what individuals can do today
This presentation aligns with priorities identified in key documents guiding paramedicine in Canada, including: the Paramedic Association of Canada National Occupational Competency Profile (NOCP) and the forthcoming National Occupational Standard for Paramedics (NOSP); Principles and Enabling Factors Guiding Paramedicine in Canada; and the Calls to Action under the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.
It will offer individual paramedics and service leaders both concepts and concrete action items that will help improve care in their own practice.

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Leadership Track

Neurodiversity in the Paramedic workforce

Dr. Buck Reed

Neurodiversity is a framework for understanding cognitive and neurological processing. The term is broadly used to describe individuals with autism, ADHD, dyslexia, and a range of other cognitive processing-related challenges. Knowledge of neurodiversity is still growing as this framework was only introduced in the late 1990’s and has only really gained significant recognition in the last decade.

The number of neurodiverse individuals may be as high as 15-20% in the population, however the rate of formal diagnosis can be low and the range of functional impacts from neurodiversity varies widely in both type and severity.

The number of neurodiverse paramedics is unknown but is likely to match the population figures. Neurodiversity in paramedics can provide both challenges and opportunities. On one hand, paramedic practice relies heavily on external displays of empathy, understanding context, and navigating change – all of which can be challenges for neurodiverse people. Alternatively, neurodiverse individuals can often perform a range of cognitive tasks much more effectively than neurotypical people, are often highly creative and often excel areas like analysis and project work.

Paramedicine is structurally neurotypical and as a result can be a challenge for neurodiverse individuals. It is likely that neurodiverse paramedics maybe challenged by paramedic service recruitment processes and testing. Neurodiverse paramedics may struggle with context, may become overstimulated in some settings and may be likely to face social challenges both in their colleagues finding them “odd” or navigating social interaction. Conversely, neurodiversity may be a protective factor against mental health injury, may allow for greatly enhanced pattern recognition and analysis and may provide benefits in a range of work functions.

Substantially more work needs to be done in understanding the impact of neurodiversity on those practicing paramedicine. Paramedic services need to consider creating both recruitment processes and workplace structures which support neurodiversity. Likewise, paramedic managers require training and orientation in managing neurodiverse staff. For practitioners, there are a range of strategies to assist in functioning in a neuro-typically structured organisation and world. With support, most neurodiverse individuals can function effectively in paramedicine and in fact, provided additional capacity through unique skill sets and capabilities.

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Education Track

Return of the mass gathering: strategies to mitigate the impact of events on paramedic services

Haddon Rabb

This presentation will focus on how mass gatherings impact prehospital systems and share strategies to aid in mitigating their effect on paramedic services. The goal of the talk is that the attendees will feel more comfortable with engaging in event medical planning and supporting events in their community. The sources of this presentation will pull from academic and grey literature, crowd safety guidelines, and operational learnings. Specifically, this talk will touch on the following topics:
1. The mass gathering landscape (e.g. types of events, post-pandemic trends, brief overview of the field of mass gathering medicine), including:
a. Mass gathering misconceptions
b. Stakeholders' involvement, considerations on who should be involved
c. Onsite medical teams overview (difference between scopes, types of teams)
d. What legislation aids with event medical care
i. Crowd questions- are there bylaws in place in your region around onsite event medical care?
2. The impact of events on the prehospital and healthcare system
a. What are the trends for hospital transports from events
b. What mitigation strategies should be considered
i. Crowd questions- What other strategies does your service utilize?
3. Mitigation strategies across the event lifecycle:
a. Risk assessment strategies (e.g., what kind of paramedic support is needed, do regional paramedics need to be onsite? Etc.)
b. Pre-event considerations (e.g., tabletops, questions to consider asking, etc.)
c. Event considerations (e.g., how do you prepare your crew, what training [e.g., crowd management] is helpful, etc.)
i. Crowd safety, including cardinal signs of crowd emergencies
d. Post-event considerations (e.g., finance implications, improving response for future years, etc.)
4. Paramedic Services guidance and endorsements
a. Findings from the Canadian Mass Gathering Medicine Paramedic Service Working Group shared
5. Event safety resources
a. Several resources (with a QR code for access) will be shared and discussed
6. Questions/Discussion period

2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
Specialty Track

The medical communication center clinical team: perspectives from a Paramedic specialist, nurse, and physician - ACP, MD, RN from NS

Jessica Chisholm
Rob Groom
Andrew Travers
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

KEYNOTE SPEAKER & CLOSING REMARKS

Dr. Ron Stewart
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